The Constellation of the Elephant

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8.5"x11" SOLD OUT

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Black - Matted - 14.0x16.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 14.0x16.5

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17"x22" SOLD OUT

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Black - Matted - 22.5x27.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 22.5x27.5

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30"x40" 2 of 2 available

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Black - Framed to Image - 30x40

White - Framed to Image - 30x40      OUR PICK

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More About This Edition:

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Directly supports the artist
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Artist Statement


I have long been interested in the idea of finding one's way, both literally and metaphorically. The stars can give you your bearings like Polaris or tell you your longitude and latitude. The Mesopotamians saw many things in the heavens: Orion's belt, and the twelve signs of the zodiac to name but a few. Later, others saw different patterns there so that, for instance, the Assyrian Hired Man and the Swallow became the constellations of Aries and Pisces. What struck me about these star maps is that with the slight effort of imagination one can see what one wants there, just as a cloud can look like a camel, a hat and a trombone respectively to different people. A constellation implies a relationship. The stars are grouped together to form a pattern and then a label is put on that pattern. Perception works in much the same way. We call a flat surface with four (although not necessarily) legs a table. But whence this identity? What defines "tableness?" I decided to come up with my own set of imaginary constellations, of which the Elephant is the first. First drawn in pencil, it was scanned into a computer and there turned into a negative. I have sought to make it pleasing to the eye, and to give it a stark simplicity so that it will look well in many sorts of space.


Alexander Beeching | See All Editions


Artist, illustrator and lover of all things creative, Alex Beeching stands for lateral thinking, innovation and draughtsmanship.  Armed with a degree in photography, film and imaging from the Scottish Film Academy, Beeching has braved the waters of freelance illustration and fine art since 2007. Before that he gleaned invaluable experience with Rp3Beechwood, a top 30 UK Ad agency, with whom he still regularly collaborates.