Mound of Butter

by Antoine Vollon

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Artist Statement

Mound of Butter is one of French painter Antoine Vollon’s best known works. Created between 1875-1885, it features thick layers of paint and heavy brush strokes, mimicking the mouthwatering markings of the wooden spatula. A true Realist, Vollon’s rich yellows and deep browns capture butter at its best. Delightfully dolloped high with fresh eggs flanking it’s billowing cheesecloth cloak, Mound of Butter shows off the true crème de la crème of French dairy. While kitchen scenes and food preparation were common motifs in 19th century still life painting, Vollon’s work is so abundantly expressive and lavishly textured that “it might have been painted with butter itself”, according to art critic Grace Glueck.

Details

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Medium:

Hahnemuhle Fine Art Baryta

Edition Structure:
8"x10" | edition of 10
11"x14" | edition of 250
16"x20" | edition of 50

Antoine Vollon

Antoine Vollon (1833-1900) was a French realist painter best known for his still lifes and landscapes. The son of an ornamental craftsman, Vollon studied engraving and printmaking at the École des Beaux-Arts in Lyon, and later began working decorating enamelled pans and stoves. He taught himself to paint and moved to Paris in 1859 to pursue the artform as a career. There, he became close friends with several well-known artists and authors of the time, such as Alexandre Dumas and Honoré Daumier. In Paris, Vollon became a student of Théodule Ribot and was largely influenced by 17th century Dutch still... Read More
life painters. However, as still lifes were considered the lowest acceptable genre for the Salon, the official art exhibition of the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris, Vollon set his sights on figure painting, winning first prize at the 1876 Salon for his work, Femme du Pollet à Dieppe (Seine-Inferieure). However, one scathing bit of criticism from fellow artist Édouard Manet seemed to solidify Vollon’s reputation as truly a still life painter. Despite this, Vollon gained wide recognition amongst critics and the public, receiving numerous awards, and was elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts in 1897. He died in 1900 while painting at Versailles, just months after receiving the Grand Prix Award at the Paris World’s Fair.
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