Fireworks at Ikenohata

by Kobayashi Kiyochika

Select Size

Add Custom Frame

Learn More

Shipping for frames only available within U.S.

Add Custom Frame

Learn More

Shipping for frames only available within U.S.

Add Custom Frame

Learn More

Shipping for frames only available within U.S.

Add Custom Frame

Learn More

Shipping for frames only available within U.S.

Add Custom Frame

Learn More

Shipping for frames only available within U.S.

Select size to add art to your cart

Successfully added to cart! Click here to view your cart.

Artist Statement

Created in 1881, Fireworks at Ikenohata sets us amongst a silhouetted crowd just as a summer spectacle of pyrotechnics commences over Shinobazu Pond. Awash in a deep inky blue, the still surface of the water illuminates the atmosphere with reflections of window lights and soaring sparklers. A string of bright lanterns emits just enough light to glimpse a few patterned kimonos amid the shadows, while two distinctly brimmed hats nod to the rapid Westernization Japan was undergoing at the time.

Why We Love It

Fireworks at Ikenohata is a still moment enveloped in anticipation—a sentimental gathering pressing pause on swift changes. These days we’ve come to cherish this sort of break in the chaos of the pandemic. (What day is it anyway?) While American culture typically associates such dazzling displays with the month of July, fireworks are an integral part of the Japanese Obon holiday (August 13-16), which has honored the spirits of ancestors for centuries. Today, Obon is filled with food stalls, festival games, and family gatherings. And in the spirit of reunion and remembrance, Fireworks at Ikenohata offers a timely pause to savor the waning days of summer. Read more on the blog!

Details

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Medium:

Museo Portfolio Rag

Edition Structure:
8"x10" | edition of 10
11"x14" | edition of 150
16"x20" | edition of 50
20"x24" | edition of 25
24"x30" | edition of 10

Kobayashi Kiyochika

Kobayashi Kiyochika (1847-1915) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist, known for his colorful woodblock prints often featuring the rapid modernization and Westernization of Japan during the Meiji period (1868-1912). Often referred to as “the last ukiyo-e artist”, Kiyochika’s work oscillates between depictions of modern technology and nostalgia for the past. His style of  kōsenga, or “light ray artworks, explore the play of light against nocturnal scenes.
See All Editions