A CBS Special Presentation

by Hollis Brown Thornton

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Artist Statement

A lot of my work uses relics of past, especially technology, to represent how our world changes. A CBS Special Presentation combines an old TV and advertisement with a Victorian wallpaper pattern, combining two different periods of the past, a simplification of the idea we are surrounded by an incredible range of history. The wallpaper patterns have a simple beauty with being somewhat complex in their repetition. The TV with rotary dials personifies how simple the television once was, without the dozens of menus and buttons on the control. At the same time, modern flatscreen televisions have that elegant exterior, while these older boxes have much more going on. And finally, the CBS ad bumper, those short moments are my memory of television growing up. I like images that are very quick and memorable, very similar to the nature of memory, you often break things down into their simplest version.

Details

+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Medium:

Museo PR

Hollis Brown Thornton

Hollis Brown Thornton was born and raised in Aiken, SC.  He received his BFA from the University of South Carolina in 1999.  In 2001, he moved to Chicago.  He lived there for four years, working as gallery director of Mongerson Galleries and installation assistant at Russell Bowman Art Advisory.  He returned to Aiken in 2005, where he continues to live and work in a warehouse studio.
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