Stuart Klipper

Stuart Klipper was born in the Bronx in 1941. He then lived in Stockholm, Sweden, moved to Minneapolis in 1970 and currently resides there. He has made six visits to Antarctica to photograph, and has also worked in Greenland, Iceland, Svalbard, Alaska and Lapland (in the area irradiated by the Chernobyl disaster). Other major forays have taken him across Northern Australia; the deserts of Israel and Sinai; the tropical rain forests of Costa Rica, Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego; and Sri Lanka and Pakistan. He has logged many thousands of miles at sea, photographing on all of the Earth's oceans and seas. For over 30 years, he has made photographs in all 50 states, distilling and crystallizing the defining characteristics of American regions. Other undertakings include extensively photographing the First World War cemeteries and memorials of the Western Front, major physics and astronomy research installations throughout the U.S. and the Anasazi ruins of the Southwest.  His photographs have been exhibited in, and collected by, major museums in the U.S. and overseas; foremost, the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center, The Jewish Museum, the Israel Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Kunsthalle Bonn and the Moderna Museet. He has been the recipient of several major grants, including two each from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Bush Foundation, and three each from the McKnight Foundation and the Minnesota State Arts Board. He is a recipient of the U.S. Navy's Antarctic Service Medal. He was also visiting professor, Art Department, Colorado College, 1978 to 2008.

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