Baseball

by Henry Sandham

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Artist Statement

Painted in the late 19th century, Baseball is a showcase of Canadian artist Henry Sandham’s peak illustrating prowess. Sandham was best known for his historical paintings and prolific illustrations in popular books and magazines of the time. His work was exhibited widely at the Boston Art Club, the American Watercolor Society of New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts in London among an abundance of other esteemable venues.


With a tendency toward sentimentality in his imagery, Sandham captures not just a moment of action, but the whole peanuts, Cracker Jacks, day-out-with-dad pastime. Players gaze up at the ball in play, breeze blowing in the flags behind, and the next-at-bats lounge casually on the bench, all gently cloaked in the yellowy haze of summer weather. Baseball at once encapsulates the excitement of a game-changing instant and the atmospheric ease of America’s favorite spectator sport.

Why We Love It

This 19th century morsel of Americana was actually painted by a Canadian. Henry Sandham had a tendency toward sentimentality in his art, which worked in his favor while capturing a subject so iconically American. Baseball is more than just a fixed moment in the game—it’s eloquently environmental. The details Sandham’s worked in convey a vibe, telling a story about patience and anticipation, home teams and fans in the stands, dusty midday light and rolled up sleeves to beat the heat. Players eye a ball we can’t see, an outfielder edges toward a catch, others fidget on the bench, a languid breeze ruffles flags around the ballpark. You can practically smell the concession stand ... Read more on the blog!

Details

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Medium:

Museo Portfolio Rag

Edition Structure: 
8"x10" | edition of 10
11"x14" | edition of 100
16"x20" | edition of 25

Henry Sandham

Born in Montreal, Henry Sandham (1842-1910) decided at an early age to pursue an art career, finding employment in Scottish-Canadian photographer William Notman’s photographic studio at age 14. Without access to a local art school, Sandham learned his craft from Notman’s art director, John Arthur Fraser and other local artists such as Otto Reinhold Jacobi. Several years after Fraser’s departure to found another branch, Sandham became Notman’s new partner and the studio was renamed Notman and Sandham in 1877. Sandham devised a careful method of composite photography, posing photographic images mounted on painted backgrounds—a technique for which the studio became... Read More
known for. Maintaining a close friendship with John Arthur Fraser throughout his life, Sandham eventually married Fraser’s sister, Agnes in 1865. In 1877, Sandham began illustrating for Scribner’s Monthly, his work accompanying the writing of numerous notable authors leading him to become a charter member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. Moving to Boston in 1880 and ending his partnership with Notman soon after, Sandham withdrew from business and began to focus on illustration and painting. In 1882, Sandham was assigned by The Century Magazine (successor to Scribner’s) to accompany American author and activist, Helen Hunt Jackson, in her investigation of the lives and hardships of Southern California’s Mission Indians. This work informed Jackson’s bestselling 1884 novel, Ramona, for which Sandham illustrated the 1900 reprint. Sandham was best known for his historical paintings and prolific illustrations in popular books and magazines of the time, and his work was exhibited widely at the Boston Art Club, the American Watercolor Society of New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts in London among an abundance of others.
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