Midway, Neshoba County Fair, Philadelphia, Mississippi

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More About This Edition:

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Directly supports the artist
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Artist Statement


The Neshoba County Fair is different from the county fairs we have in the Midwest. It has most of the things you usually find: livestock judging, a beauty pageant, horse racing and a midway. The unusual thing is that it has over 600 one- and two-story cabins, called fairhouses, arranged into streets and neighborhoods on the fairgrounds. People own these cabins and live in them for the seven days of the fair. They are highly prized, and are handed down from one generation to the next. For the visitor, it gives the place a strange feeling: you are not sure if you're in a public or private space. When I was there, I felt like I'd come upon some extravagant neighborhood block party and it was obvious, at least to me, I was from another block. The question of being on the inside or outside of a group is something I think most photographers think about. Do we photograph the familiar, or the exotic? Are we reporters, or memoirists? If I went back there in July, or twenty years later, what pictures would I take?


Mike Sinclair | See All Editions


Mike Sinclair is an architectural and fine art photographer living in Kansas City, Missouri.   His photographs are frequently published in the Architectural Press and elsewhere, including the New York Times, Metropolis, Architectural Record and Interior Design.  His work is in several public and private collections, including The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, also in Kansas City.  Sinclair was a 2009 First Edition Hot Shot and has participated in Mixtape and the Hey, Hot Shot! group exhibition at Jen Bekman Gallery