City Lights United States of America

by Space Editions

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11"x14" Temporarily Unavailable
$60

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Black - Matted - 16.5x19.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 16.5x19.5

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16x20

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8"x10" Temporarily Unavailable
$24

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Black - Matted - 14.0x16.5      OUR PICK

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11x14

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Natural - 11x14

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16"x20" 1 of 100 available
$240

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Black - Matted - 22.5x27.5      OUR PICK

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24"x30" Temporarily Unavailable
$1200

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Black - Matted - 30.5x36.5      OUR PICK

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30"x40" Temporarily Unavailable
$2400

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Black - Framed to Image - 30x40      OUR PICK

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Artist Statement

 

We've already brought you incredible pics from the geniuses at NASA. Blue Marble—all three of our special editions—reveal Earth in all its exquisite detail, drawing our eye to the geography of our planet. The Black Marble editions highlight a much more fragile and impermanent feature: us. "Nothing tells us more about the spread of humans across the Earth than city lights," says Chris Elvidge of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. The Black Marble images (so popular that NASA created a new app, Worldview) were collected over nine days in April 2012, and 13 days in October 2012, by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP), a civilian satellite that makes data available to scientists on Earth within minutes. The final composite photograph is the product of 312 orbits around the earth. The sensor is so responsive that it can detect a single ship in the ocean. The light is a mix of manmade structures and natural phenomena like volcanoes and atmospheric glow.

 

Space Editions

 

Around 20x200 HQ, we've been talking about space: romantic notions of the great unknown, iconic and uplifting moments in history, how it shapes our vision of the future, since the mournful end of the shuttle program. Here's our curated a collection of images from the NASA archive.

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