Every Outdoor Basketball Court in Manhattan

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11"x11" 340 of 500 available

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Black - Matted - 16.5x16.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 16.5x16.5

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8"x8" SOLD OUT

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Black - Matted - 14.0x14.0      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 14.0x14.0

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16"x16" 28 of 50 available

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Black - Matted - 22.5x22.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 22.5x22.5

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24"x24" 8 of 10 available

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Black - Matted - 30.5x30.5      OUR PICK

White - Matted - 30.5x30.5

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More About This Edition:

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Directly supports the artist
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Artist Statement


"Thus the life of the collector manifests a dialectical tension between the poles of disorder and order." — Walter Benjamin

My series of satellite prints is a collection of collections, in that each print houses a selection of things cut out from Google Satellite View — whether that be swimming pools, parking lots or sections of the Great Salt Lake. Though geographically they represent a vast (and fragmented) amount of landscape, the collections carry with them the feelings of smallness, vulnerability and nostalgia that I find inherent in satellite imagery. These prints are, on the one hand, collapsed pictures of my own disoriented wanderings through the endlessness of a scanned world — endlessly scrolling, endlessly zooming in. But they are also, as in any collection, acts of love. In accumulating, cutting out and ordering each piece of satellite imagery, I have fixed them here against the perpetual tide of updated satellite pictures and the ephemerality of the internet.


Jenny Odell | See All Editions


Jenny Odell is a Bay Area native who mines imagery from online environments, most typically Google Maps, in an attempt to create candid portraits of humanity and its built environment. Because her practice exists at the intersection of research and aesthetics, Odell has often been compared to a natural scientist (specifically, a lepidopterist). Her work has been exhibited at the Google Maps Headquarters, Les Rencontres D'Arles, Arts Santa Monica, Fotomuseum Antwerpen, La Gaîté Lyrique in Paris, and East Wing Gallery in Dubai. It's also turned up in TIME Magazine's LightBox, The Atlantic, The Economist, WIRED, the NPR Picture Show, and Imagine Architecture (Gestalten, 2014). Odell teaches at Stanford University. Learn more about Jenny in our In the Studio interview