Crows in the Moonlight

by Sakai Hoitsu

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Artist Statement

Crows in the Moonlight is one of Sakai Hoitsu’s pieces that is directly modeled after an Ogata Korin work. It is a fantastic example of the characteristics of the Rinpa school with graphic, simple forms; innovative use of space; and golden tones. Though the Rinpa style originally focused on recreating scenes from classical literature, when Hoitsu revived the style in the nineteenth century, he shifted the themes to concentrate on natural images. In this piece, we’re on the same level as the dark avian forms, admiring their shapes in silhouette created by the large glowing moon.

Details

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Directly supports the artist
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

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Museo PR

Sakai Hoitsu

Sakai Hoitsu is regarded as one of the masters of the Rinpa school, based on the work of Ogata Korin. Born in 1761 to the lord of Himeji Castle, Hoitsu lived in Edo (now Tokyo) until 1780, when he moved to Kyoto to study painting. He studied many styles—Kano, ukiyo-e, Maruyama, and manga—until he settled on the Rinpa school. In 1797, citing poor health, he became a Buddhist monk with the Nishihongan Temple. While there, Hoitsu studied the works of Ogata Korin and his brother, Ogata Kenzan, working on reproducing a number of their works. Their work represented a shift,... Read More
moving away from photo realism toward simple, bold forms. Hoitsu’s reproductions and original artworks helped revive this decorative style, making Ogata Korin a major influence even after his death. In addition to his work as a revivalist, Hoitsu became an accomplished painter and haiku poet in his own right before his death in 1829.
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