Auto parts shop. Atlanta, Georgia

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8"x10" 6 of 20 available

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14.0x16.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

14.0x16.5 - White - Matted

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30.5x36.5 - White - Matted

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Artist Statement


From mid 1935 to early 1937, Walker Evans worked for the historical unit of the Farm Security Administration to create a photographic survey of rural America during the Great Depression. While Evans traveled all over the U.S. during his time with the FSA, it is his work from Southern and rural America that stands out.

This image, made at Cherokee Auto Parts in Atlanta Georgia, shows again Evans' penchant for hand-lettering and type. The sign above the shop seems based on the font Windsor, though it is different enough to indicate it was painted by hand. That human touch is part of what makes this particular image so charming, especially when viewed in contrast to the neon signs and standardized fonts of modern day. It is this image’s nostalgic appeal that inspired Alice Cooper's Greatest Hits cover artwork, and its enduring power to attract that makes it an excellent addition to any wall.


Walker Evans | See All Editions


Legendary American photgrapher Walker Evans (1903-1975) is best known for his captivating large format images of the American vernacular. His iconic images entered the public's collective consciousness with appearances in magazines, books, and museums around the world since the 1930s. He has inspired generations of photographers and artists, changing the field with his narratives of American life. In 1938, MOMA exhibited the first decade of his photographs in his first retrospective American Photographs.

Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Walker Evans moved to New York City as a young man to pursue writing. He studied writing at Williams College for a year, and later the Sorbonne, picking up photography in 1928. The interplay between language and image were central to his work. As a small child and throughout his life, Evans collected picture postcards. A 2009 exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Walker Evans and the Picture Postcard, featured his 9,000 postcard collection to reveal the symbiotic relationship with his own photographs.