Seventh Avenue Looking South from 35th Street, Manhattan

Select your print and framing options

10"x8" SOLD OUT
$24

Custom Frame Learn more

14.0x16.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

14.0x16.5 - White - Matted

Shipping available within the US only

14"x11" 406 of 500 available
$60

Custom Frame Learn more

16.5x19.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

16.5x19.5 - White - Matted

Shipping available within the US only

20"x16" 42 of 50 available
$240

Custom Frame Learn more

22.5x27.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

22.5x27.5 - White - Matted

Shipping available within the US only

More About This Edition:

+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Artist Statement

 

Berenice Abbott was famously resistant to the ever human temptation towards prettification, revelling instead in contrasts in both nature and culture. She took this image on December 5, 1935 with an eye to illuminating the play between all of the urban elements, while capturing the ever-increasing dominance of the New York skyscraper. She wrote once: "The concern is not with the architectural rendering of detail, the buildings of 1935 overshadowing all else, but with a synthesis which shows the skyscraper in relation to the less colossal edifices which preceded it: city vistas, waterways, highways and means of transportation; areas where peculiarly urban aspects of human living can be observed; city squares where the trees die for lack of sun and air; narrow and dark canyons where visibility fails because there is no light; litter blowing about a waterfront slip; relics of the age of General Grant and Queen Victoria where these have survived; the onward march of the steam shovel, all these things and many more comprise New York City in 1935."

 

Berenice Abbott | See All Editions

 

Berenice Abbott was an American photographer best known for her black and white photography of New York City architecture and urban design of the 1930s. Abbott was born in Springfield, Ohio. She attended the Ohio State University, but left in early 1918. Abbott went to Europe in 1921, spending two years studying sculpture in Paris and Berlin. In addition to her work in the visual arts, Abbott published poetry in the experimental literary journal transition. Abbott first became involved with photography in 1923, when Man Ray, looking for somebody who knew nothing about photography and thus would do as he said, hired her as a darkroom assistant at his portrait studio in Montparnasse. In 1926, she had her first solo exhibition (in the gallery Au Sacre du Printemps) and started her own studio on the rue du Bac. In early 1929, Abbott visited New York and was struck by its photographic potential. She moved to the city and began work on her New York project, which she worked on independently until 1935, when she was hired by the Federal Art Project as a project supervisor for her Changing New York project. She continued to take the photographs of the city, but she had assistants to help her both in the field and in the office. This arrangement allowed Abbott to devote all her time to producing, printing and exhibiting her photographs. By the time she resigned from the FAP in 1939, she had produced 305 photographs that were then deposited at the Museum of the City of New York.

Vintage Editions | See All Editions

 

For our Vintage Editions series, our curators scour historical archives for both timeless classics and heretofore unseen gems. These images come back to life as exhibition-quality prints now available to everyone. As a bonus, purchasing equals patronage: sales from Vintage Editions prints go towards supporting our growing roster of artists.