Snow Crystals

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8"x8" 10 of 20 available
$24

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14.0x14.0 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

14.0x14.0 - White - Matted

Shipping available within the US only

11"x11" 197 of 200 available
$60

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16.5x16.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

16.5x16.5 - White - Matted

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16"x16" 50 of 50 available
$240

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22.5x22.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

22.5x22.5 - White - Matted

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20"x20" 10 of 10 available
$600

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27.5x27.5 - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

27.5x27.5 - White - Matted

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Artist Statement

 

Over the course of his life, Wilson A. Bentley photographed an astounding number of snow crystals—more than 5000 to be exact. It’s from this extensive collection that the 20x200 curatorial team hand-picked nine of our favorite flakes and composed them into the single 3x3 grid image you see here. This snowflake assortment not only provides a sense of the broad range of Bentley’s photomicrographs, but also gives a collector ample opportunity to appreciate the meticulousness of Bentley’s work and the natural symmetry that made his subjects so dang stunning.

 

Vintage Editions | See All Editions

 

For our Vintage Editions series, our curators scour historical archives for both timeless classics and heretofore unseen gems. These images come back to life as exhibition-quality prints now available to everyone. As a bonus, purchasing equals patronage: sales from Vintage Edition prints go towards supporting our growing roster of artists.

Wilson A. Bentley | See All Editions

 

On January 15th, 1885, Wilson Alwyn Bentley became the first known person to photograph a snowflake. A farmer by trade, the Jericho, Vermont resident was no stranger to the snow. Dead set on documenting the remarkable beauty of snow crystals, Bentley tinkered tirelessly until he found a way to catch them on a black velvet background and quickly transfer them to a microscope slide—just long enough to photograph individual flakes in isolation for the fleeting moment before they melted into oblivion.

Bentley would go on to capture more than 5,000 icy crystals over the course of his life, setting the precedent for snowflake photography and informing scientific opinion on the subject. In fact, it was Bentley (in collaboration with professor George Henry Perkins) who first made the case that no two snowflakes are alike, solidifying that arctic adage. It’s no wonder the farmer-turned-groundbreaking photographer became known as “Snowflake” Bentley.