Trayvon Martin + We Are All Trayvon Martin (pair)

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8"x10" + 8"x10" (Pair) 15 of 20 available
$48

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14.0x16.5 (Pair) - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

14.0x16.5 (Pair) - White - Matted

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11"x14" + 11"x14" (Pair) 200 of 200 available
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16.5x19.5 (Pair) - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

16.5x19.5 (Pair) - White - Matted

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16"x20" + 16"x20" (Pair) 50 of 50 available
$480

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22.5x27.5 (Pair) - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

22.5x27.5 (Pair) - White - Matted

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24"x30" + 24"x30" (Pair) 10 of 10 available
$2400

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30.5x36.5 (Pair) - Black - Matted      OUR PICK

30.5x36.5 (Pair) - White - Matted

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Artist Statement

 

These two paintings Trayvon Martin and We Are All Trayvon Martin depicts Martin — the 17-year-old African-American who was fatally shot in 2012 by neighborhood-watch volunteer George Zimmerman in Sanford, Fla. — with his father, and the latter shows me with my son.

I created both paintings after finding a photo of Trayvon Martin and his father shortly after the teen was killed. It was a touching photo that brought me to tears for many reasons, one of which is that I have a son and I can only imagine the pain that father must be going through.

This is what inspired me to re-create the photograph with my own son and then make a pair of paintings of both images. I think there is something about this photograph of Trayvon Martin and his father that cuts through the politics of the story and forces people to empathize, and I think this is the key to fixing the problems that this story epitomizes.

 

Rudy Shepherd | See All Editions

 

Rudy Shepherd’s work explores the nature of evil through the mediums of painting, drawing, sculpture and performance. This exploration involves investigations into the lives of criminals and victims of crime. He explores the complexity of these stories and the grey areas between innocence and guilt in a series of paintings and drawings of both the criminals and the victims, making no visual distinctions between the two. Going along with these portraits is a series of sculptures called the Black Rock Negative Energy Absorbers. They are a group of sculptures meant to remove negative energy from people allowing them to respond to life with the more positive aspects of their personality.