Why You Shouldn't Live in New York

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10"x8" SOLD OUT
$24

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14.0x16.5 - Black - Floated

14.0x16.5 - White - Floated      OUR PICK

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14"x11" 485 of 500 available
$60

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14.0x17.0 - Black - Floated

14.0x17.0 - White - Floated      OUR PICK

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20"x16" 48 of 50 available
$240

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19.0x23.0 - Black - Floated

19.0x23.0 - White - Floated      OUR PICK

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30"x24" 20 of 20 available
$1200

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27.0x33.0 - Black - Floated

27.0x33.0 - White - Floated      OUR PICK

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Medium: Museo Portfolio Rag
More About This Edition:

+ Limited-edition, exclusive to 20x200
+ Museum quality: archival inks, 100% cotton rag paper unless noted
+ Signed + numbered certificate of authenticity included
+ Directly supports the artist
+ Handcrafted custom-framing is available

Our quoted dimensions are for the size of paper containing the images, not the printed image itself. We do not alter the aspect ratio, nor do we crop or resize the artists’ originals. All of our prints have a minimum border of .5 inches to allow for framing.

Artist Statement

 

I visited IMOCA in Indianapolis last year in the spring after giving an artist talk at Herron School of Art and Design. The storefront museum reminded me of some of my favorite non-profit spaces in New York from Artists Space to Momenta Art. When Jeffrey Teuton asked if I'd be interested in creating a print to benefit IMOCA, I felt obliged to make a drawing to support non-profit spaces. "Why You Shouldn't Live in New York" is probably best understood as the debate I have with myself about the cost of being an artist (or working in the arts).

 

William Powhida | See All Editions

 

William Powhida makes fun of the art world to highlight the paradoxes and absurdities of economic and social value systems that keep the sphere of visual art afloat on a tide of inequality. His work relies on research and participation to diagram, list, perform and critique the forces that shape perceptions of value. He is responsible or partly responsible for exhibitions including "Overculture" at Postmasters Gallery, "Bill by Bill" at Charlie James Gallery, "POWHIDA" at Marlborough Gallery and "#class" at Winkleman Gallery.