The Last Days of Disco: New Art Fit for the Dance Floor December 29 2016


The Last Days of Disco by Hollis Brown Thornton
8"x10" ($24) | 11"x14" ($60) | 16"x20" ($240) | 24"x30" ($1,200) 

Spoiler alert: New Year’s Eve is usually a little disappointing. You get all dressed up in your sparkliest duds, spend too much money on plans that have a high probability of going astray, and if you’re anything like us you top it all off with a mondo champagne headache for your sins. Luckily, we’ve got Hollis Brown Thornton’s newest edition in our celebration arsenal this year, and it lives up to all its glittery glory.

Thornton is comfortable maneuvering all sorts of artistic tools and techniques, but The Last Days of Disco was his first time using metallic Sharpie. The experiment panned out, and produced a piece that calls on an old school object in an unexpected, new school way. The artist has long held an intense interest in retro imagery—much of his work revolves around recognizable relics of the past and the curiously disjointed, subjectively simplified nature of memory.

The disco ball in The Last Days of Disco is an incomplete sphere that fades into grayness around its edges. There's no real background, only the contextual clues of the colors reflected in the mirror facets, which provide more of an ephemeral mood than anything specific. It is suggestive, nebulous, familiar and enigmatic—much like memory itself.

No matter what The Last Days of Disco brings to mind, we’re fairly certain it's the chicest disco ball reference in existence. It’s animated by an appealing combo of millennial pink, forest green, azure blue and other happy-making, almost earthy hues—reflections of the coolest crowd we can’t quite see. Even diehard disco-haters will feel festive AF with this on their walls.

So crank up the Donna Summer and order yourself a limited-edition print of The Last Days of Disco. We’re starting 2017 off with an art party.

With art for everyone,
Jen Bekman + Team 20x200